When you pick up a newspaper, read an article online, or watch TV news, do you trust what’s being said?  SHOULD you trust it?  The credibility of the media has tanked in recent years.  And not just because the President fights back by talking about “fake news.”  Several surveys reveal that 2/3 of Americans just don’t trust the media to give them accurate, balanced, or objective stories.  Whether you love President Trump or not, 91% of news coverage about him is negative.  91%!  No wonder he tweets!  But it has not caused the public to love the media—they are barely more popular than food poisoning.  As one who has been the target of the news media for nearly 30 years in politics, I’ve come to some simple conclusions:

  1. If you read your own quotes in a story and they make you mad, you weren’t quoted correctly or in proper context.  If it’s YOUR own words, you aren’t mad at the reporter unless your words were twisted, taken out of context or incomplete.
  2. If you read a story about yourself and you can’t detect whether the reporter likes you or not, that’s a good reporter and a good story.
  3. Good journalism isn’t just telling the truth; it’s telling the truth in proportion to all the truth there is.  Simply put, is the story getting the most attention because it really impacts the most people in the most significant way, or just because it amplifies a flaw or a faux pas of the figure in the story? 
  4. Inflection and facial expressions can totally change a story.  For example, I’ll read the same line but each time use a different inflection or facial expression:
Senator Pie-hole said the tax bill would lower taxes.

Senator Pie-hole SAID the tax bill would lower taxes.

Senator Pie-hole said the tax bill would LOWER taxes.

Senator Pie-hole said the TAX BILL would lower taxes.


Commentary continues below advertisement


Just be changing my inflection or facial expression, I change how the story is perceived. 

The media loves to question authority figures, but they HATE to be questioned as to their fairness or objectivity.  Granted, a free press is a vital foundation to our liberty, but a free press that isn’t a professional and responsible press would help destroy our liberty. 

The media has a job and it’s not to give candidates and elected officials a tongue bath of love and approval.  But the difference between reporting news and commenting on the news is that reporting gives you sterile and passionless facts and believes you are smart enough to form your own opinions.  A commentator wants to give you an opinion and steer you only toward the facts that support his or her opinion, which hopefully becomes yours.


Commentary continues below advertisement


The media doesn’t want you to believe politicians at face value.  Fine—you shouldn’t.  But neither should you believe the media at face value either.  Unless of course, we’re talking about the stuff I say.  Then, you can TAKE IT TO THE BANK!

So tonight, we pull back the curtain and let you see the media unmasked.  And here’s a warning—it ain’t a pretty sight.

 

PLEASE LEAVE ME A COMMENT.  I READ THEM!

Comments 6-10 of 75

  • Barbara Saxton

    11/13/2017 08:32 AM

    That has happened to me. A statement that I made was completely changed thru inflection. I love our President, and support him completely. I supported you, until you dropped out!

  • Alice

    11/13/2017 07:22 AM

    Thank You Jesus, that you have sent us a man that tell the truth and loves you. Thanks Gov.

  • Margaret Hamm

    11/13/2017 06:29 AM

    No. I do not trust the news media. The have been caught in too many lies. Some have even admitted they lie. I think they just want to push their own agenda. And, it seems most are leftists. I think they should just print the truth no matter which way it lays, but it seems those days are over. It would be nice if someone could start a news channel built on the truth only.

  • Eva Woods

    11/12/2017 08:17 PM

    In answer to the question, "Should you trust the media?", in a word - "NOOOO!!!!"
    But we like, trust, respect, & believe YOU, Governor Huckabee!! Thank You for being honest and trustworthy! Keep it coming!

  • Katrina

    11/12/2017 07:29 PM

    I don't watch the news and I don't know anyone in my age group (25-35) who does!
    Definitely not trustworthy, never mind monotone and depressing. I can't stand listening to the media, let alone reading their articles. My husband is a journalist and he hears it from me all the time. Thankfully he covers sports. I would love to see a "NEW news channel/station" created by young people who desire to hear unbiased, true reporting. I would support it wholeheartedly. I will allow myself to watch presidential addresses or speaches, because then I hear what is said from the presidents own mouth, but even then that can be skewed by devious editing.

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When you pick up a newspaper, read an article online, or watch TV news, do you trust what’s being said?  SHOULD you trust it?  The credibility of the media has tanked in recent years.  And not just because the President fights back by talking about “fake news.”  Several surveys reveal that 2/3 of Americans just don’t trust the media to give them accurate, balanced, or objective stories.  Whether you love President Trump or not, 91% of news coverage about him is negative.  91%!  No wonder he tweets!  But it has not caused the public to love the media—they are barely more popular than food poisoning.  As one who has been the target of the news media for nearly 30 years in politics, I’ve come to some simple conclusions:

  1. If you read your own quotes in a story and they make you mad, you weren’t quoted correctly or in proper context.  If it’s YOUR own words, you aren’t mad at the reporter unless your words were twisted, taken out of context or incomplete.
  2. If you read a story about yourself and you can’t detect whether the reporter likes you or not, that’s a good reporter and a good story.
  3. Good journalism isn’t just telling the truth; it’s telling the truth in proportion to all the truth there is.  Simply put, is the story getting the most attention because it really impacts the most people in the most significant way, or just because it amplifies a flaw or a faux pas of the figure in the story? 
  4. Inflection and facial expressions can totally change a story.  For example, I’ll read the same line but each time use a different inflection or facial expression:
Senator Pie-hole said the tax bill would lower taxes.

Senator Pie-hole SAID the tax bill would lower taxes.

Senator Pie-hole said the tax bill would LOWER taxes.

Senator Pie-hole said the TAX BILL would lower taxes.


Commentary continues below advertisement


Just be changing my inflection or facial expression, I change how the story is perceived. 

The media loves to question authority figures, but they HATE to be questioned as to their fairness or objectivity.  Granted, a free press is a vital foundation to our liberty, but a free press that isn’t a professional and responsible press would help destroy our liberty. 

The media has a job and it’s not to give candidates and elected officials a tongue bath of love and approval.  But the difference between reporting news and commenting on the news is that reporting gives you sterile and passionless facts and believes you are smart enough to form your own opinions.  A commentator wants to give you an opinion and steer you only toward the facts that support his or her opinion, which hopefully becomes yours.


Commentary continues below advertisement


The media doesn’t want you to believe politicians at face value.  Fine—you shouldn’t.  But neither should you believe the media at face value either.  Unless of course, we’re talking about the stuff I say.  Then, you can TAKE IT TO THE BANK!

So tonight, we pull back the curtain and let you see the media unmasked.  And here’s a warning—it ain’t a pretty sight.

 

PLEASE LEAVE ME A COMMENT.  I READ THEM!

Comments 6-10 of 75

  • Barbara Saxton

    11/13/2017 08:32 AM

    That has happened to me. A statement that I made was completely changed thru inflection. I love our President, and support him completely. I supported you, until you dropped out!

  • Alice

    11/13/2017 07:22 AM

    Thank You Jesus, that you have sent us a man that tell the truth and loves you. Thanks Gov.

  • Margaret Hamm

    11/13/2017 06:29 AM

    No. I do not trust the news media. The have been caught in too many lies. Some have even admitted they lie. I think they just want to push their own agenda. And, it seems most are leftists. I think they should just print the truth no matter which way it lays, but it seems those days are over. It would be nice if someone could start a news channel built on the truth only.

  • Eva Woods

    11/12/2017 08:17 PM

    In answer to the question, "Should you trust the media?", in a word - "NOOOO!!!!"
    But we like, trust, respect, & believe YOU, Governor Huckabee!! Thank You for being honest and trustworthy! Keep it coming!

  • Katrina

    11/12/2017 07:29 PM

    I don't watch the news and I don't know anyone in my age group (25-35) who does!
    Definitely not trustworthy, never mind monotone and depressing. I can't stand listening to the media, let alone reading their articles. My husband is a journalist and he hears it from me all the time. Thankfully he covers sports. I would love to see a "NEW news channel/station" created by young people who desire to hear unbiased, true reporting. I would support it wholeheartedly. I will allow myself to watch presidential addresses or speaches, because then I hear what is said from the presidents own mouth, but even then that can be skewed by devious editing.

When you pick up a newspaper, read an article online, or watch TV news, do you trust what’s being said?  SHOULD you trust it?  The credibility of the media has tanked in recent years.  And not just because the President fights back by talking about “fake news.”  Several surveys reveal that 2/3 of Americans just don’t trust the media to give them accurate, balanced, or objective stories.  Whether you love President Trump or not, 91% of news coverage about him is negative.  91%!  No wonder he tweets!  But it has not caused the public to love the media—they are barely more popular than food poisoning.  As one who has been the target of the news media for nearly 30 years in politics, I’ve come to some simple conclusions:

  1. If you read your own quotes in a story and they make you mad, you weren’t quoted correctly or in proper context.  If it’s YOUR own words, you aren’t mad at the reporter unless your words were twisted, taken out of context or incomplete.
  2. If you read a story about yourself and you can’t detect whether the reporter likes you or not, that’s a good reporter and a good story.
  3. Good journalism isn’t just telling the truth; it’s telling the truth in proportion to all the truth there is.  Simply put, is the story getting the most attention because it really impacts the most people in the most significant way, or just because it amplifies a flaw or a faux pas of the figure in the story? 
  4. Inflection and facial expressions can totally change a story.  For example, I’ll read the same line but each time use a different inflection or facial expression:
Senator Pie-hole said the tax bill would lower taxes.

Senator Pie-hole SAID the tax bill would lower taxes.

Senator Pie-hole said the tax bill would LOWER taxes.

Senator Pie-hole said the TAX BILL would lower taxes.


Commentary continues below advertisement


Just be changing my inflection or facial expression, I change how the story is perceived. 

The media loves to question authority figures, but they HATE to be questioned as to their fairness or objectivity.  Granted, a free press is a vital foundation to our liberty, but a free press that isn’t a professional and responsible press would help destroy our liberty. 

The media has a job and it’s not to give candidates and elected officials a tongue bath of love and approval.  But the difference between reporting news and commenting on the news is that reporting gives you sterile and passionless facts and believes you are smart enough to form your own opinions.  A commentator wants to give you an opinion and steer you only toward the facts that support his or her opinion, which hopefully becomes yours.


Commentary continues below advertisement


The media doesn’t want you to believe politicians at face value.  Fine—you shouldn’t.  But neither should you believe the media at face value either.  Unless of course, we’re talking about the stuff I say.  Then, you can TAKE IT TO THE BANK!

So tonight, we pull back the curtain and let you see the media unmasked.  And here’s a warning—it ain’t a pretty sight.

 

PLEASE LEAVE ME A COMMENT.  I READ THEM!

Comments 6-10 of 75

  • Barbara Saxton

    11/13/2017 08:32 AM

    That has happened to me. A statement that I made was completely changed thru inflection. I love our President, and support him completely. I supported you, until you dropped out!

  • Alice

    11/13/2017 07:22 AM

    Thank You Jesus, that you have sent us a man that tell the truth and loves you. Thanks Gov.

  • Margaret Hamm

    11/13/2017 06:29 AM

    No. I do not trust the news media. The have been caught in too many lies. Some have even admitted they lie. I think they just want to push their own agenda. And, it seems most are leftists. I think they should just print the truth no matter which way it lays, but it seems those days are over. It would be nice if someone could start a news channel built on the truth only.

  • Eva Woods

    11/12/2017 08:17 PM

    In answer to the question, "Should you trust the media?", in a word - "NOOOO!!!!"
    But we like, trust, respect, & believe YOU, Governor Huckabee!! Thank You for being honest and trustworthy! Keep it coming!

  • Katrina

    11/12/2017 07:29 PM

    I don't watch the news and I don't know anyone in my age group (25-35) who does!
    Definitely not trustworthy, never mind monotone and depressing. I can't stand listening to the media, let alone reading their articles. My husband is a journalist and he hears it from me all the time. Thankfully he covers sports. I would love to see a "NEW news channel/station" created by young people who desire to hear unbiased, true reporting. I would support it wholeheartedly. I will allow myself to watch presidential addresses or speaches, because then I hear what is said from the presidents own mouth, but even then that can be skewed by devious editing.