Russian hackers strike again

October 6, 2017

I can’t recall any Administration that has been so bedeviled by hackers and leakers. The leaks seem to have dried up a bit, but early on, it was almost unnecessary for hackers to try to breach the White House because there seemed to be so many entrenched staffers and contractors intent on undermining the Administration by leaking classified data, including phone conversations between the President and other world leaders. In their zeal to harm Trump, they didn’t seem to care how much they hurt the United States, in either national security or our relationships with other nations.

Now that they’re not doing the hackers’ job for them as often, outside forces seem to be picking up the slack. In addition to the concerns about Kelly’s phone, it was reported yesterday that Russian state hackers stole NSA documents via a contractor’s private laptop infested with a Kremlin-built computer virus. Ironically, the stolen documents reportedly contained NSA cyber security secrets, such as how the NSA penetrates foreign computer networks and defends US networks from hackers. (The Russians deny it; you can read the full story at the link below.)

If our top intelligence agencies can’t even keep hackers from hacking into their secrets about how they stop hackers, maybe it’s time to go back to using quill pens and carrier pigeons. Or at the very least, firing a lot of people and being a heck of a lot more careful about who is hired to replace them.

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  • Annita Louise Whisman-Rackley

    10/08/2017 04:20 PM

    Way back in the day when I was earning my BA, I remember a professor talking about how that in the future (and that was in 1984) it would be the tech experts that would rule the world. He said they would become the "priests of knowledge" because no one could get information without their expertise. Books are rapidly declining, and so are newspapers, magazines, and other forms of communication. The generation that spent their teen years texting are now young adults entering the work force and the government. They trust tech because that's what they've known since they were born. Finding straight information on the internet is becoming more difficult as the naïve scream for more censorship, hoping to silence their philosophical enemies. Yes, some things should not be on the internet, but therein lies the problem. Who is worthy to police the internet? It's just as it has always been. A few elite tech geeks can control everything people read on the internet. The "priests of knowledge" have been anointed.

Russian hackers strike again

October 6, 2017

I can’t recall any Administration that has been so bedeviled by hackers and leakers. The leaks seem to have dried up a bit, but early on, it was almost unnecessary for hackers to try to breach the White House because there seemed to be so many entrenched staffers and contractors intent on undermining the Administration by leaking classified data, including phone conversations between the President and other world leaders. In their zeal to harm Trump, they didn’t seem to care how much they hurt the United States, in either national security or our relationships with other nations.

Now that they’re not doing the hackers’ job for them as often, outside forces seem to be picking up the slack. In addition to the concerns about Kelly’s phone, it was reported yesterday that Russian state hackers stole NSA documents via a contractor’s private laptop infested with a Kremlin-built computer virus. Ironically, the stolen documents reportedly contained NSA cyber security secrets, such as how the NSA penetrates foreign computer networks and defends US networks from hackers. (The Russians deny it; you can read the full story at the link below.)

If our top intelligence agencies can’t even keep hackers from hacking into their secrets about how they stop hackers, maybe it’s time to go back to using quill pens and carrier pigeons. Or at the very least, firing a lot of people and being a heck of a lot more careful about who is hired to replace them.

READ MORE

Leave A Comment

Note: Fields marked with an * are required.

Your Information
Your Comment
BBML accepted!
Captcha

Comments 1-1 of 1

  • Annita Louise Whisman-Rackley

    10/08/2017 04:20 PM

    Way back in the day when I was earning my BA, I remember a professor talking about how that in the future (and that was in 1984) it would be the tech experts that would rule the world. He said they would become the "priests of knowledge" because no one could get information without their expertise. Books are rapidly declining, and so are newspapers, magazines, and other forms of communication. The generation that spent their teen years texting are now young adults entering the work force and the government. They trust tech because that's what they've known since they were born. Finding straight information on the internet is becoming more difficult as the naïve scream for more censorship, hoping to silence their philosophical enemies. Yes, some things should not be on the internet, but therein lies the problem. Who is worthy to police the internet? It's just as it has always been. A few elite tech geeks can control everything people read on the internet. The "priests of knowledge" have been anointed.