A Man on the Moon - 50 years later

Less than 3 minute read

July 20, 2019

Today seems like a perfect time to remind the world of what humans can achieve if they just stop calling each other names and killing each other. Not only because that message is so sorely needed now, but because today is the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s vision of a man on the moon becoming a reality.  It’s a day to celebrate an astonishing landmark achievement for mankind, for science and (pardon my political incorrectness) for the United States of America.  It’s also a day to honor three of the greatest Huck’s Heroes in history: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins. 

While other kids in the '60s had heroes in sports, TV or movies, my heroes were the astronauts.  I knew all the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts by name and watched every launch.  But Apollo 11 was different.  Those of us who saw it live were blessed to witness something that had never been seen before in the entire history of the world.

On July 20th, 1969, my family in Hope, Arkansas were united with billions of people worldwide as we sat riveted to the flickering, ghostly images on our black and white TV. CBS News icon Walter Cronkite explained this miracle of science, as the Apollo 11 landing module, the Eagle, touched down on the moon. 

And then, the whole world held its breath and watched in silent wonder as Neil Armstrong emerged from the capsule and took the first step off that ladder, the immortal “one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” He was soon joined by Buzz Aldrin as they became the first humans ever to stand on ground that was not of this Earth. 

After 2-1/2 hours on the lunar surface, Armstrong and Aldrin blasted off, rejoined Collins, who was orbiting alone in the command module, and they returned home safe and sound, which itself was as much of a miracle as the successful moon landing.  They did it in a spacecraft that to modern eyes looks impossibly small and fragile, with far less computing power than an iPhone has today (although without the pioneers at NASA, there wouldn't be iPhones today.)  But it’s still more awe-inspiring than any modern CGI-filled space adventure movie. 

The astronauts left behind a bag containing a gold replica of an olive branch, a disc with goodwill messages from the leaders of 73 nations, and a plaque that reads, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon, July 1969 A.D.  We came in peace for all mankind.”  It was the best message mankind had to offer.  And it was delivered by the three best men mankind had to offer. 

There were critics of the space program then and now, but I believe it’s one of America’s great legacies, and slashing its budget was incredibly shortsighted.  If you’ve ever had laser surgery, GPS, a cell phone, a PC, satellite TV, steel-belted radials, a dust buster or any one of a million high tech innovations, then thank the space program.  Maybe cures for Alzheimer’s or heart disease will be next. Our astronauts are true heroes, and every day we live better lives because of them. 

Still, we should support space exploration not just for the benefits, but because exploring is a God-given drive.  It's in our natures always to be striving to press onward and upward. We should cultivate that impulse, not curtail it. 

 

 

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A Man on the Moon - 50 years later

Comments 26-32 of 32

  • Christopher P Kelley

    07/20/2019 02:09 PM

    Thanks be to GOD!
    Their first Act on the Lunar Surface was a very quiet Holy Communion.
    THEN they stepped out of the capsule in view of the entire, waiting world.

  • James Louviere

    07/20/2019 02:09 PM

    At the time of the moon landing I was a 15 year old American exchange student in France. I was a big fan of NASA since I was six years old, but I'm ashamed to admit that, while I was there, I didn't even know that Americans were on the way to the moon; I guess I was too busy and excited about my own trip overseas. And I haven't seen the Canadian Ryan Gosling's movie, and the American flag snub, but I have to say something relevant to that controversy that made a very deep impression on me. When we woke up for breakfast to join the family on the morning of the landing, I was greeted with the father of the host family holding up for me and all to see, the front page of Le Monde, which had plastered a huge picture of the Americans on the moon, and there, quite prominently, was the American flag. I think he (the father) had the biggest smile on his face that I have ever seen. My first thought (that I kept to myself), gathering it all in, was "why are you smiling so big, you are French, and those are Americans?" But I quickly realized that he was not thinking "An American has landed on the Moon, but rather, a man (a human being! one of us!) has landed on the Moon!" Of course, in 1969 the French were still very fond of the Americans (this was, of course, within living memory of the American liberation of Paris) and that fondness has soured considerably since then. Regardless, I said nothing at the time to deflate his happiness, but rather, his happiness made a very big impression on me. And though I am by no means a globalist (preferring and insisting instead on as much decentralization of power as possible, such that, at least, the sovereignty of nations is respected), but (to finally offer a small olive branch to Ryan Gosling), it is important to realize that the human race is, in fact, one family under God, and the due respect that we owe to our own individual sovereign countries, should be seen, not as a reason to gloat and lord our superiority over others, but as a means to grow and become even greater, so that, by our devotion to our own founding Christian principles, self control and subjecting ourselves to the rule of God's law, to humbly declare that we have been blessed by God and that we might help others and be an example to others so they too might achieve great things, all for the glory of God, our common Father and Creator.

  • Mary Carolyn Trucano

    07/20/2019 02:07 PM

    My husband and I well remember that event - we had been married for less than two years, and were living in Ft. Worth, Texas (my husband was enrolled at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary - a fact which explains the reason we had not purchased a television set, which would be a distraction to his studies). I worked in the Personnel Office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Worth District; through the generous loan of a portable TV from one of the division chiefs in my office, we had set up the loaner TV in the living room of our sparsely furnished apartment, and unfolded the sofa bed in the living room to watch the events during the night. Interestingly enough, as a federal employee, because of the moon landing, we did not have to work that day - it was a "holiday"! What an incredible event to watch as a Christian (truly a worship experience of God's creation) and as an American (perseverance, commitment of purpose, and a sense of respect).

  • Sam L Kemp

    07/20/2019 01:58 PM

    Yes Governor, I remember it well too. I was in the Navy, and several of us were gathered around the TV in the home of Pappy & Kathy Rae in the little village of Gonnasu, Japan. Pappy was an Army Specialist stationed with us at the Joint Base in Hakata. Normally a rowdy crowd, (as Pappy was a saxaphone player in the G.I. Country Band, Romi & The Cedar Valley Boys), that day we watched in somber, almost reverent silence as Neil & Buzz descended to the Lunar Surface. You could have heard a pin drop. Gives me cold chills just thinking about it! Literally gave us a feeling of being there with them ! I will never forget it!

  • Stephen H. Thomas

    07/20/2019 01:29 PM

    You forgot to mention the NASA contributions of Tang and kidney dialysis. Hmmmm...

  • Ari Dale

    07/20/2019 01:21 PM

    I enjoy and anticipate your newsletters but why, Governor, must we click through to continue reading? I would so much prefer to have the lead article presented in full in the body of the email.

  • Harold Levi

    07/20/2019 01:14 PM

    The Democrats are correct, the members of the Squad are NOT Socialists, they are Communists as are the great bulk of the so called-Democrats!! Just ask Nikita Khrushchev.

A Man on the Moon - 50 years later

Less than 3 minute read

July 20, 2019

Today seems like a perfect time to remind the world of what humans can achieve if they just stop calling each other names and killing each other. Not only because that message is so sorely needed now, but because today is the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s vision of a man on the moon becoming a reality.  It’s a day to celebrate an astonishing landmark achievement for mankind, for science and (pardon my political incorrectness) for the United States of America.  It’s also a day to honor three of the greatest Huck’s Heroes in history: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins. 

While other kids in the '60s had heroes in sports, TV or movies, my heroes were the astronauts.  I knew all the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts by name and watched every launch.  But Apollo 11 was different.  Those of us who saw it live were blessed to witness something that had never been seen before in the entire history of the world.

On July 20th, 1969, my family in Hope, Arkansas were united with billions of people worldwide as we sat riveted to the flickering, ghostly images on our black and white TV. CBS News icon Walter Cronkite explained this miracle of science, as the Apollo 11 landing module, the Eagle, touched down on the moon. 

And then, the whole world held its breath and watched in silent wonder as Neil Armstrong emerged from the capsule and took the first step off that ladder, the immortal “one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” He was soon joined by Buzz Aldrin as they became the first humans ever to stand on ground that was not of this Earth. 

After 2-1/2 hours on the lunar surface, Armstrong and Aldrin blasted off, rejoined Collins, who was orbiting alone in the command module, and they returned home safe and sound, which itself was as much of a miracle as the successful moon landing.  They did it in a spacecraft that to modern eyes looks impossibly small and fragile, with far less computing power than an iPhone has today (although without the pioneers at NASA, there wouldn't be iPhones today.)  But it’s still more awe-inspiring than any modern CGI-filled space adventure movie. 

The astronauts left behind a bag containing a gold replica of an olive branch, a disc with goodwill messages from the leaders of 73 nations, and a plaque that reads, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon, July 1969 A.D.  We came in peace for all mankind.”  It was the best message mankind had to offer.  And it was delivered by the three best men mankind had to offer. 

There were critics of the space program then and now, but I believe it’s one of America’s great legacies, and slashing its budget was incredibly shortsighted.  If you’ve ever had laser surgery, GPS, a cell phone, a PC, satellite TV, steel-belted radials, a dust buster or any one of a million high tech innovations, then thank the space program.  Maybe cures for Alzheimer’s or heart disease will be next. Our astronauts are true heroes, and every day we live better lives because of them. 

Still, we should support space exploration not just for the benefits, but because exploring is a God-given drive.  It's in our natures always to be striving to press onward and upward. We should cultivate that impulse, not curtail it. 

 

 

Leave a Comment

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Your Information
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BBML accepted!
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More Stories

A Man on the Moon - 50 years later

Comments 26-32 of 32

  • Christopher P Kelley

    07/20/2019 02:09 PM

    Thanks be to GOD!
    Their first Act on the Lunar Surface was a very quiet Holy Communion.
    THEN they stepped out of the capsule in view of the entire, waiting world.

  • James Louviere

    07/20/2019 02:09 PM

    At the time of the moon landing I was a 15 year old American exchange student in France. I was a big fan of NASA since I was six years old, but I'm ashamed to admit that, while I was there, I didn't even know that Americans were on the way to the moon; I guess I was too busy and excited about my own trip overseas. And I haven't seen the Canadian Ryan Gosling's movie, and the American flag snub, but I have to say something relevant to that controversy that made a very deep impression on me. When we woke up for breakfast to join the family on the morning of the landing, I was greeted with the father of the host family holding up for me and all to see, the front page of Le Monde, which had plastered a huge picture of the Americans on the moon, and there, quite prominently, was the American flag. I think he (the father) had the biggest smile on his face that I have ever seen. My first thought (that I kept to myself), gathering it all in, was "why are you smiling so big, you are French, and those are Americans?" But I quickly realized that he was not thinking "An American has landed on the Moon, but rather, a man (a human being! one of us!) has landed on the Moon!" Of course, in 1969 the French were still very fond of the Americans (this was, of course, within living memory of the American liberation of Paris) and that fondness has soured considerably since then. Regardless, I said nothing at the time to deflate his happiness, but rather, his happiness made a very big impression on me. And though I am by no means a globalist (preferring and insisting instead on as much decentralization of power as possible, such that, at least, the sovereignty of nations is respected), but (to finally offer a small olive branch to Ryan Gosling), it is important to realize that the human race is, in fact, one family under God, and the due respect that we owe to our own individual sovereign countries, should be seen, not as a reason to gloat and lord our superiority over others, but as a means to grow and become even greater, so that, by our devotion to our own founding Christian principles, self control and subjecting ourselves to the rule of God's law, to humbly declare that we have been blessed by God and that we might help others and be an example to others so they too might achieve great things, all for the glory of God, our common Father and Creator.

  • Mary Carolyn Trucano

    07/20/2019 02:07 PM

    My husband and I well remember that event - we had been married for less than two years, and were living in Ft. Worth, Texas (my husband was enrolled at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary - a fact which explains the reason we had not purchased a television set, which would be a distraction to his studies). I worked in the Personnel Office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Worth District; through the generous loan of a portable TV from one of the division chiefs in my office, we had set up the loaner TV in the living room of our sparsely furnished apartment, and unfolded the sofa bed in the living room to watch the events during the night. Interestingly enough, as a federal employee, because of the moon landing, we did not have to work that day - it was a "holiday"! What an incredible event to watch as a Christian (truly a worship experience of God's creation) and as an American (perseverance, commitment of purpose, and a sense of respect).

  • Sam L Kemp

    07/20/2019 01:58 PM

    Yes Governor, I remember it well too. I was in the Navy, and several of us were gathered around the TV in the home of Pappy & Kathy Rae in the little village of Gonnasu, Japan. Pappy was an Army Specialist stationed with us at the Joint Base in Hakata. Normally a rowdy crowd, (as Pappy was a saxaphone player in the G.I. Country Band, Romi & The Cedar Valley Boys), that day we watched in somber, almost reverent silence as Neil & Buzz descended to the Lunar Surface. You could have heard a pin drop. Gives me cold chills just thinking about it! Literally gave us a feeling of being there with them ! I will never forget it!

  • Stephen H. Thomas

    07/20/2019 01:29 PM

    You forgot to mention the NASA contributions of Tang and kidney dialysis. Hmmmm...

  • Ari Dale

    07/20/2019 01:21 PM

    I enjoy and anticipate your newsletters but why, Governor, must we click through to continue reading? I would so much prefer to have the lead article presented in full in the body of the email.

  • Harold Levi

    07/20/2019 01:14 PM

    The Democrats are correct, the members of the Squad are NOT Socialists, they are Communists as are the great bulk of the so called-Democrats!! Just ask Nikita Khrushchev.

A Man on the Moon - 50 years later

Less than 3 minute read

July 20, 2019

Today seems like a perfect time to remind the world of what humans can achieve if they just stop calling each other names and killing each other. Not only because that message is so sorely needed now, but because today is the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s vision of a man on the moon becoming a reality.  It’s a day to celebrate an astonishing landmark achievement for mankind, for science and (pardon my political incorrectness) for the United States of America.  It’s also a day to honor three of the greatest Huck’s Heroes in history: Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins. 

While other kids in the '60s had heroes in sports, TV or movies, my heroes were the astronauts.  I knew all the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts by name and watched every launch.  But Apollo 11 was different.  Those of us who saw it live were blessed to witness something that had never been seen before in the entire history of the world.

On July 20th, 1969, my family in Hope, Arkansas were united with billions of people worldwide as we sat riveted to the flickering, ghostly images on our black and white TV. CBS News icon Walter Cronkite explained this miracle of science, as the Apollo 11 landing module, the Eagle, touched down on the moon. 

And then, the whole world held its breath and watched in silent wonder as Neil Armstrong emerged from the capsule and took the first step off that ladder, the immortal “one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind.” He was soon joined by Buzz Aldrin as they became the first humans ever to stand on ground that was not of this Earth. 

After 2-1/2 hours on the lunar surface, Armstrong and Aldrin blasted off, rejoined Collins, who was orbiting alone in the command module, and they returned home safe and sound, which itself was as much of a miracle as the successful moon landing.  They did it in a spacecraft that to modern eyes looks impossibly small and fragile, with far less computing power than an iPhone has today (although without the pioneers at NASA, there wouldn't be iPhones today.)  But it’s still more awe-inspiring than any modern CGI-filled space adventure movie. 

The astronauts left behind a bag containing a gold replica of an olive branch, a disc with goodwill messages from the leaders of 73 nations, and a plaque that reads, “Here men from the planet Earth first set foot upon the moon, July 1969 A.D.  We came in peace for all mankind.”  It was the best message mankind had to offer.  And it was delivered by the three best men mankind had to offer. 

There were critics of the space program then and now, but I believe it’s one of America’s great legacies, and slashing its budget was incredibly shortsighted.  If you’ve ever had laser surgery, GPS, a cell phone, a PC, satellite TV, steel-belted radials, a dust buster or any one of a million high tech innovations, then thank the space program.  Maybe cures for Alzheimer’s or heart disease will be next. Our astronauts are true heroes, and every day we live better lives because of them. 

Still, we should support space exploration not just for the benefits, but because exploring is a God-given drive.  It's in our natures always to be striving to press onward and upward. We should cultivate that impulse, not curtail it. 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Note: Fields marked with an * are required.

Your Information
Your Comment
BBML accepted!
Captcha

More Stories

A Man on the Moon - 50 years later

Comments 26-32 of 32

  • Christopher P Kelley

    07/20/2019 02:09 PM

    Thanks be to GOD!
    Their first Act on the Lunar Surface was a very quiet Holy Communion.
    THEN they stepped out of the capsule in view of the entire, waiting world.

  • James Louviere

    07/20/2019 02:09 PM

    At the time of the moon landing I was a 15 year old American exchange student in France. I was a big fan of NASA since I was six years old, but I'm ashamed to admit that, while I was there, I didn't even know that Americans were on the way to the moon; I guess I was too busy and excited about my own trip overseas. And I haven't seen the Canadian Ryan Gosling's movie, and the American flag snub, but I have to say something relevant to that controversy that made a very deep impression on me. When we woke up for breakfast to join the family on the morning of the landing, I was greeted with the father of the host family holding up for me and all to see, the front page of Le Monde, which had plastered a huge picture of the Americans on the moon, and there, quite prominently, was the American flag. I think he (the father) had the biggest smile on his face that I have ever seen. My first thought (that I kept to myself), gathering it all in, was "why are you smiling so big, you are French, and those are Americans?" But I quickly realized that he was not thinking "An American has landed on the Moon, but rather, a man (a human being! one of us!) has landed on the Moon!" Of course, in 1969 the French were still very fond of the Americans (this was, of course, within living memory of the American liberation of Paris) and that fondness has soured considerably since then. Regardless, I said nothing at the time to deflate his happiness, but rather, his happiness made a very big impression on me. And though I am by no means a globalist (preferring and insisting instead on as much decentralization of power as possible, such that, at least, the sovereignty of nations is respected), but (to finally offer a small olive branch to Ryan Gosling), it is important to realize that the human race is, in fact, one family under God, and the due respect that we owe to our own individual sovereign countries, should be seen, not as a reason to gloat and lord our superiority over others, but as a means to grow and become even greater, so that, by our devotion to our own founding Christian principles, self control and subjecting ourselves to the rule of God's law, to humbly declare that we have been blessed by God and that we might help others and be an example to others so they too might achieve great things, all for the glory of God, our common Father and Creator.

  • Mary Carolyn Trucano

    07/20/2019 02:07 PM

    My husband and I well remember that event - we had been married for less than two years, and were living in Ft. Worth, Texas (my husband was enrolled at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary - a fact which explains the reason we had not purchased a television set, which would be a distraction to his studies). I worked in the Personnel Office of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Ft. Worth District; through the generous loan of a portable TV from one of the division chiefs in my office, we had set up the loaner TV in the living room of our sparsely furnished apartment, and unfolded the sofa bed in the living room to watch the events during the night. Interestingly enough, as a federal employee, because of the moon landing, we did not have to work that day - it was a "holiday"! What an incredible event to watch as a Christian (truly a worship experience of God's creation) and as an American (perseverance, commitment of purpose, and a sense of respect).

  • Sam L Kemp

    07/20/2019 01:58 PM

    Yes Governor, I remember it well too. I was in the Navy, and several of us were gathered around the TV in the home of Pappy & Kathy Rae in the little village of Gonnasu, Japan. Pappy was an Army Specialist stationed with us at the Joint Base in Hakata. Normally a rowdy crowd, (as Pappy was a saxaphone player in the G.I. Country Band, Romi & The Cedar Valley Boys), that day we watched in somber, almost reverent silence as Neil & Buzz descended to the Lunar Surface. You could have heard a pin drop. Gives me cold chills just thinking about it! Literally gave us a feeling of being there with them ! I will never forget it!

  • Stephen H. Thomas

    07/20/2019 01:29 PM

    You forgot to mention the NASA contributions of Tang and kidney dialysis. Hmmmm...

  • Ari Dale

    07/20/2019 01:21 PM

    I enjoy and anticipate your newsletters but why, Governor, must we click through to continue reading? I would so much prefer to have the lead article presented in full in the body of the email.

  • Harold Levi

    07/20/2019 01:14 PM

    The Democrats are correct, the members of the Squad are NOT Socialists, they are Communists as are the great bulk of the so called-Democrats!! Just ask Nikita Khrushchev.