Advertisement

November 26, 2021
|

Wednesday afternoon, a jury returned guilty verdicts on nearly all charges, including felony murder and aggravated assault, against Travis McMichael, his father Gregory and neighbor William Bryan. The three white men were accused of killing Ahmaud Arbery, a young unarmed black man, near Brunswick, Georgia. They had spotted Arbery running past their houses and assumed he was fleeing from committing a burglary, although no evidence ever arose to prove he’d committed any crimes. They chased him, confronted him, and Travis shot him with a shotgun. He also reportedly used a racial epithet, which earned him an extra conviction for malice murder.

This link from Fox News has continually updated information on the case, which had officials on edge due to fears of rioting if they’d been acquitted. Which, it is important to remind people who constantly attack the court system as racist, they were not.

https://www.foxnews.com/live-news/ahmaud-arbery-trial-jury-deliberations-wednesday

This is the third high-profile murder verdict in less than a week, all in cases that involved charges of racist courts. Yet in this one, the white men who murdered a black man were found guilty. In the Andrew Coffee case, a black man who shot white police officers who staged a surprise late night raid of his home was acquitted on self-defense grounds. And in the Kyle Rittenhouse case, a white teenager who shot three white men who were attacking him was also acquitted on self-defense charges, which many ascribed to racism for unclear reasons. Some media outlets even mistakenly thought Rittenhouse's attackers were black.

I don’t know what conclusion we’re supposed to draw from all these verdicts about the American court system, but if juries are making their decisions based solely on race, they don’t seem very consistent about it. Here's a wild thought: maybe most jurors take their responsibilities seriously and base their decisions on the testimony and the evidence. And if that doesn't mesh with the verdicts of the media or random people on Twitter, maybe it's because the jury actually knows more about the case than they do.

Leave a Comment

Note: Fields marked with an * are required.

Your Information
Your Comment
BBML accepted!
Captcha

More Stories

No Comments