Two New Books About The Trump Administration

August 13, 2020 |

There are two new books out about the Trump Administration, one by a former White House insider and the other co-written by a black political activist. But before you brace yourself for whatever mud the authors have agreed to peddle for a fat advance, you should know these are not the kind of back-stabbing books we’ve come to expect.

The first is by former Trump Director of Oval Office Operations, Madeleine Westerhout, and it’s called “Off the Record: My Dream Job at the White House, How I Lost It, and What I Learned.” She has some harsh words, but not for Trump. Westerhout saves her criticism for the media, and with good cause. After a dinner at Trump’s golf resort in New Jersey, she had a few drinks with some reporters she thought were her friends and who assured her their conversation was off-the-record. She made some catty jokes about Trump’s daughter Tiffany’s weight and his relationship with his daughters. Of course, the “off the record” comments were immediately reported, and she was quickly invited to resign. She now believes they reported those stories just because they hate Trump so much and want to hurt him in any way they can. She learned the hard way not to trust the media.

Westerhout says her comments weren’t true and it “broke her heart” to hurt Trump and his family. But she has talked to him on the phone twice since and he forgave her, which she says “just goes to show how gracious he is.” In fact, she was surprised to discover that he was nothing like what she expected. And she was hardly a Trump sycophant.

Until she went to work for him, all she knew about him was the horrible things she’d heard in the media, so she hadn’t even voted for him in 2016 (although she stresses that she did not vote for Hillary.) She was surprised to discover that he was nothing like how he had been painted. She says he’s actually a kind and friendly boss, he reads constantly, works very hard, relies heavily on female aides and is very warm toward friends, family and staffers.

Westerhout said one of her goals with her book is to counter the relentless false negative stories about Trump. I wish her luck, although I suspect that’s like trying to put out the Chicago Fire with a flyswatter.

The other new book is called “Coming Home: How Black Americans Will Re-elect Trump.” It’s by African-American conservative political activist Vernon Robinson III and Bruce Eberle of the Eberle Associates political fundraising firm.

They tell a similar story of not supporting Trump at first and only voting for him because he had to be better than Hillary Clinton (Note: he is also much better than Joe Biden.) But they came around after seeing him keep his promises about governing like a real conservative with his judicial appointments, peace through strength, cutting of regulations and more, as well as forcing new trade deals, making our allies pay more for their defense, strengthening border security and other measures that put Americans first.

But the thing that’s unusual about this book is its theory that Trump will win reelection because he’ll get a higher percentage of the black vote than any Republican in a century. Two reasons: he’s actually doing things to help black Americans (sentencing reform, job creation, rising wages, opportunity zones, protecting their churches) and unlike most Republicans, he’s actively appealing to them for their votes and not just letting the Democrats’ false claims that he’s a “racist” define him.

I don’t know if that will win him enough black votes to tip the election, although the Democrats wouldn’t have to lose that many for it to sink them. That’s why they viciously attack any black person who dares to oppose them (i.e., if you don’t vote for Biden, “you ain’t black.”) I know it can be done because when I was Governor of Arkansas, I reached out to the black community, listened to their concerns and worked with them to try to solve some problems. They were skeptical at first (they’d grown up hearing a lot of anti-Republican propaganda), but they eventually realized I was sincere. I’m proud to say that I won reelection with the highest percentage of the black vote of any Arkansas Governor since Reconstruction. But of course, I didn’t have a national media churning out a 24/7/365 river of poison accusing me of being a racist. That’s a lot to have to overcome.

November’s election will present a stark choice for African-Americans. Republicans offer proven policies that make them safer, freer and more prosperous. Democrats offer policies that have failed black communities for decades and are currently making life exponentially worse for them. But they’ve resorted to tokenism by adding a black VP candidate and they’re ramping up the false accusations of racism. I think that the choice is pretty clear. I hope enough black voters agree.

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  • Denise Jackson

    08/13/2020 01:43 PM

    Wonder how many black American's actually consider Kamala Harris black? Her Jamacian father is part black and doesn't support her politics. When I moved to Georgia, I was surprised when some blacks told me "you know Obama isn't one of us". (And the conversation wasn't about politics or race.). I am not black, but if I am offended by the Democrats' 'token blacks' being dark skinned and foreign raised individuals rather than genuine black Americas, seems like some non-conservation blacks are going to notice too. Don't think it is a coincidence that Obama and Harris have such a non black American background. The Democrats (ie. Soros) are sending a subtle message that will be noticed by some black Democrats.