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Mars Here We Come

February 20, 2021

Congratulations to all the scientists, engineers and others who helped accomplish yesterday’s milestone landing of the rover Perseverance on the surface of Mars.

The mission was timed for the closest alignment of Earth and Mars, but that still meant a trip of 300 million miles, or seven months of traveling – so far away that radio signals from Percy (the rover’s nickname) take nearly 12 minutes to reach Earth. It will spend the next two years drilling into the Martian surface to collect rock samples, which will be brought back by another rocket by 2031 to search for signs of bygone microscopic life. Let's hope that by that time, there are still signs of intelligent life on Earth.

Two other spacecraft, from the UAE and China, are also orbiting Mars. China also plans to send down a small rover to seek signs of life. And if it finds any, to immediately oppress it.


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Rush Limbaugh RIP

February 18, 2021

While many of us have been bracing for Rush Limbaugh’s passing ever since he revealed his battle against terminal lung cancer, the news that came Wednesday of his death at 70 still sent a shock wave of grief though his many millions of fans.

Joe Clark RIP

January 2, 2021

Retired high school principal Joe Clark died Tuesday at 82 at his home in Florida after a long battle with an unspecified illness.

During the ‘80s, Clark became nationally famous for his tough love approach to education. He turned around one of the worst schools in New Jersey, expelling 300 students in one day to get crime and drugs under control. He painted over graffiti, chained the doors shut against criminals and required students to know and sing the school song on demand. He was also famous for patrolling the halls with a bullhorn and a baseball bat. In a statement, his family said, “Steadfast in his approach, Clark explained that the bat was not a weapon but a symbol of choice: a student could either strike out or hit a home run."

Liberals assailed him for instilling discipline in public school, but President Reagan offered him a White House policy adviser position. The public gave its verdict when “Lean On Me,” a movie of his story starring Morgan Freeman as Clark, became a major hit and audiences gave it a rare Cinemascore rating of A+.

Here are some remembrances of Clark from Morgan Freeman, who called him a father figure to the kids and “the best of the best in terms of education.”

RIP Chuck Yeager

December 9, 2020

It’s hard to imagine being shocked at news that someone had died at the age of 97. But if there were ever a man whom you could imagine being tough enough to take Death’s scythe away from him and chase him off with it, it’s retired Brigadier General Chuck Yaeger, whose wife Victoria announced on Twitter that he had passed away Monday night. We offer our sympathy and prayers for his family.

The legendary test pilot was the personification of the term “The Right Stuff,” the title of the Tom Wolfe book and movie about the NASA space program that appropriately began its story back on October 14, 1947. That’s when Yaeger strapped in behind the controls of the rocket-propelled Bell X-1 plane nicknamed the “Glamorous Glennis” and launched the space age, becoming the first man to break the sound barrier at 700 mph. Just six years later, he was setting new records by flying at 1600 mph.

His daring test pilot accomplishments were only a part of his amazing life story, which included 64 combat missions in World War II (he was shot down once, evaded capture, and made it back safely) and returning to combat flights decades later during the Vietnam War. He was a true American hero, recipient of the highest honors including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and an inspiration to soldiers, pilots, astronauts and every American.

You can read more about his remarkable life at the link above. And here’s a clip from “The Right Stuff,” dramatizing the moment when Chuck Yaeger piloted America into the space age by breaking the sound barrier. I hope this will make you want to watch the entire film, because it’s a humdinger of a movie.

Remembering September 11

September 11, 2020

Today marks the 19th anniversary of the September 11, 2001, attacks, the deadliest attacks ever on US soil. Despite coronavirus precautions, there will still be memorial ceremonies today in New York, Pennsylvania and Washington. President Trump will speak and lay a wreath at the memorial to the heroes of Flight 93. Fox News has created a continually-updated live blog page where streaming video will appear, as well as updated news and links to other memorial events.

As I wrote last year, today is a date that will live in infamy, but also in the annals of heroism.

On the morning of September 11th, 2001, our nation awoke to the shocking news that we were under savage attack by Islamic jihadists who, before the day was over, would kill nearly 3,000 people in New York, Pennsylvania and Washington. The attack was aimed at America, but because it focused on the World Trade Center, the victims were from many nations. But as much as that day displayed the cowardice and animalistic behavior of the terrorists, it also showcased the heroism and selflessness of so many Americans, from the NYPD cops and firefighters rushing toward danger to save others to citizens in cities across America standing in line for blocks to donate blood. Petty differences like race or politics were swept aside as we all came together like family, because our nation was under attack.

Those of us who lived through it can scarcely believe it was 19 years ago, as the painful memories are forever seared into our memories. But we now have colleges turning out students who have no personal memories of 9/11. Thanks to the passage of time and a media and schools that quickly buried the images lest they be too “disturbing” (or too inconvenient to PC narratives), young people have little understanding of what was felt by all Americans in the wake of that horrendous attack. This explains why we now have a crop of young people under the BLM/Antifa banners, attacking police and chanting “Death to America,” just like the people who hijacked those planes, oblivious to the evil they’re aligning themselves with.

Here are some of those 9/11 images that need to be seen and thought about a lot more often.

Young Americans’ naiveté makes them easy prey for those who seek to rewrite history so they can divide and conquer. They lull our youth into blaming the USA for every sin, letting their guards down, and being misled into handing over their hard-fought, God-given rights to those who couldn’t defeat us by force so are now working to defeat us from within.

If you have kids, I suggest a visit to the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York, which finally reopens to the public tomorrow. Those of you who are concerned about the safety of traveling to New York and would prefer to wait until Bill DeBlasio is removed from office can take a virtual visit here.

Make sure your children are taught the truth about 9/11. It was one of America’s worst days, yet in the Twin Towers and the Pentagon and on United Flight 93, we also saw Americans at their very best, coming together and heroically laying down their lives for others, whether they were police and firefighters climbing up into the doomed Towers to search for survivors or simply American citizens standing up against the hijackers and saying, “Let’s roll!,” knowing it meant their own plane would crash but they would save countless lives.

As we reflect on and remember 9/11, let’s not dwell on the murderous monsters who don’t deserve to have their names remembered. Let’s focus on honoring the victims and the many true heroes, both on that awful day and in the days and even years afterward. Let us resolve to end the miseducation of our children and start teaching them the truth about 9/11 and about America’s real history and our people’s true heroic character. And let’s never let our guard down again.