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Texas Independence Day

March 3, 2021

Today is March 2, Texas Independence Day. On this day in 1836, even as Santa Anna’s Army was laying siege to the Alamo, Texans convened at Washington-On-The-Brazos and defiantly declared their independence from Mexico, choosing David Burnet as provisional President and Sam Houston as commander-in-chief of all armed forces. Just six weeks later, shouting, “Remember the Alamo!,” Houston’s army surprised Santa Anna’s troops at San Jacinto, capturing him and forcing him to recognize Texas’ independence and withdraw.

These days, the Alamo is once again under siege, by historically revisionist “historians” who are trying to paint it as an “insignificant” battle or even a symbol of “white supremacy,” like every other great or heroic person or event in American history. They are small people lobbing spitballs at giants. Bryan Preston at PJ Media has that story and asks if “woke history” will cancel the Alamo.

While many Texans these days are not what they used to be (“Beto” O’Rourke actually got close to being elected Senator, in a land where Sam Houston, Davy Crockett, William B. Travis and James Bowie once strode), I have high hopes that enough of that Lone Star spirit still reigns that Texans will never allow the woke leftists to make them forget the Alamo and what it really stood for.

On a related subject, we’re starting to see a little of that rebellious spirit rise against the cancel culture tyrants, the same spirit that prompted Davy Crockett, after losing his Congressional race in Tennessee, to say, “You may all go to Hell, and I will go to Texas!”

The University of Texas was considering changing its revered school song, “The Eyes of Texas are Upon You,” after getting complaints that it’s racist. There’s nothing racist in the lyrics, but the title was inspired by a quote from Gen. Robert E. Lee and it was once performed at minstrel shows. On those tenuous grounds, some students were demanding that it be replaced.

Well, in Texas, you don’t diss the Alamo and you don’t ban “The Eyes of Texas Are Upon You.” The eyes of a lot of wealthy college donors were upon the woke school administrators, and they’re getting a flood of angry letters letting them know that if they dare remove that song, the flow of money will be shut off faster than Joe Biden can shut off an oil pipeline.

As one former UT law alum and now retired judge put it bluntly, "UT needs rich donors who love ‘The Eyes of Texas’ more than they need one crop of irresponsible and uninformed students or faculty who won't do what they are paid to do."

Hallelujah! Let’s hope this rebellion against anti-historical “cancel culture” lights a fire under every rational American and inspires them to stand up to the radical left and say “No more!” the same way the Alamo inspired Texans on this day in 1836 to stand up to Santa Anna and kick him back to Mexico.

Must-Read Article

By Mike Huckabee

Will COVID-19 be pretty much gone before the Democrats’ can even pass their COVID-19 “relief” bill?

One reason they’re having so much trouble passing that bill is that by some estimates, only about 9% of it is directly tied to COVID-19. To make that point, Arizona Republican Rep. Paul Gozer offered an amendment (rejected, naturally) to take all the non-COVID funds away from pork projects, foreign aid, blue state bailouts and Democrat interest groups and direct them to Americans who actually need help after being harmed by the lockdowns. It was enough to give everyone a relief check for $10,000.

And while it was reported that the bill passed the House on party lines, it should be mentioned that two Democrats, Reps. Jared Golden of Maine and Kurt Schrader of Oregon, opposed it. Golden called it nearly $2 trillion of poorly targeted, unnecessary, wasteful and unprecedented deficit spending that buries the urgent needs of struggling Americans.

It’s good to know there are still some Democrats around who can recognize those things as negatives.

Mars Here We Come

February 20, 2021

Congratulations to all the scientists, engineers and others who helped accomplish yesterday’s milestone landing of the rover Perseverance on the surface of Mars.

The mission was timed for the closest alignment of Earth and Mars, but that still meant a trip of 300 million miles, or seven months of traveling – so far away that radio signals from Percy (the rover’s nickname) take nearly 12 minutes to reach Earth. It will spend the next two years drilling into the Martian surface to collect rock samples, which will be brought back by another rocket by 2031 to search for signs of bygone microscopic life. Let's hope that by that time, there are still signs of intelligent life on Earth.

Two other spacecraft, from the UAE and China, are also orbiting Mars. China also plans to send down a small rover to seek signs of life. And if it finds any, to immediately oppress it.


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Rush Limbaugh RIP

February 18, 2021

While many of us have been bracing for Rush Limbaugh’s passing ever since he revealed his battle against terminal lung cancer, the news that came Wednesday of his death at 70 still sent a shock wave of grief though his many millions of fans.

Joe Clark RIP

January 2, 2021

Retired high school principal Joe Clark died Tuesday at 82 at his home in Florida after a long battle with an unspecified illness.

During the ‘80s, Clark became nationally famous for his tough love approach to education. He turned around one of the worst schools in New Jersey, expelling 300 students in one day to get crime and drugs under control. He painted over graffiti, chained the doors shut against criminals and required students to know and sing the school song on demand. He was also famous for patrolling the halls with a bullhorn and a baseball bat. In a statement, his family said, “Steadfast in his approach, Clark explained that the bat was not a weapon but a symbol of choice: a student could either strike out or hit a home run."

Liberals assailed him for instilling discipline in public school, but President Reagan offered him a White House policy adviser position. The public gave its verdict when “Lean On Me,” a movie of his story starring Morgan Freeman as Clark, became a major hit and audiences gave it a rare Cinemascore rating of A+.

Here are some remembrances of Clark from Morgan Freeman, who called him a father figure to the kids and “the best of the best in terms of education.”

RIP Chuck Yeager

December 9, 2020

It’s hard to imagine being shocked at news that someone had died at the age of 97. But if there were ever a man whom you could imagine being tough enough to take Death’s scythe away from him and chase him off with it, it’s retired Brigadier General Chuck Yaeger, whose wife Victoria announced on Twitter that he had passed away Monday night. We offer our sympathy and prayers for his family.

The legendary test pilot was the personification of the term “The Right Stuff,” the title of the Tom Wolfe book and movie about the NASA space program that appropriately began its story back on October 14, 1947. That’s when Yaeger strapped in behind the controls of the rocket-propelled Bell X-1 plane nicknamed the “Glamorous Glennis” and launched the space age, becoming the first man to break the sound barrier at 700 mph. Just six years later, he was setting new records by flying at 1600 mph.

His daring test pilot accomplishments were only a part of his amazing life story, which included 64 combat missions in World War II (he was shot down once, evaded capture, and made it back safely) and returning to combat flights decades later during the Vietnam War. He was a true American hero, recipient of the highest honors including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and an inspiration to soldiers, pilots, astronauts and every American.

You can read more about his remarkable life at the link above. And here’s a clip from “The Right Stuff,” dramatizing the moment when Chuck Yaeger piloted America into the space age by breaking the sound barrier. I hope this will make you want to watch the entire film, because it’s a humdinger of a movie.